The Mill on the Floss | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Janet H. Freeman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of The Mill on the Floss.
This section contains 5,776 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Janet H. Freeman

SOURCE: "Authority in The Mill on the Floss," in Philological Quarterly, Vol. 56, 1977, pp. 374-88.

In this essay, Freeman contends that the omniscient narration of The Mill on the Floss renders the novel's ending appropriate.

"By God she is a wonderful woman."—John Blackwood, upon reading the next-to-last chapter of The Mill on the Floss

Looking up from The Mill on the Floss, generations of readers have been drawn to comment on George Eliot herself—often without John Blackwood's admiring enthusiasm, but nearly always with the sense that the history of Maggie and Tom Tulliver is a highly personal narrative, as significant to the storyteller as it is to her audience. Significant, yet at the same time troubling: "What does it all come to except that human life is...

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This section contains 5,776 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Janet H. Freeman