The Merry Wives of Windsor | Literature Criticism Marvin Felheim and Philip Traci

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of The Merry Wives of Windsor.
This section contains 4,798 words
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Marvin Felheim and Philip Traci

SOURCE: "Realism in The Merry Wives of Windsor," in Ball State University Forum, Vol. XXII, No. 1, Winter, 1981, pp. 52-9.

Below, Felheim and Traci argue that The Merry Wives of Windsor is a realistic comedy by examining the credibility of the play's characterization and language; and concluding that it cannot be considered a farce.

Ford: In love the heavens themselves do guide the state; Money buys lands, and wives are sold by fate.

(V. v. 229-30)1

At the conclusion of 2 Henry IV, the epilogue promises the audience: "If you be not too much cloyed with fat meat, our humble author will continue the story, with Sir John in it, and make you merry with fair Katharine of France" (ll. 26-29). In saving Fair Katharine for Henry V,2 where, if only in report, Falstaff

The Herne the Hunter scene (Act V, scene v) from Byam Shaw's production of The Merry Wives of Windsor. The Herne...

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This section contains 4,798 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Marvin Felheim and Philip Traci