William Carleton | Critical Essay by John Kelly

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of William Carleton.
This section contains 5,012 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Kelly

Critical Essay by John Kelly

SOURCE: Introduction to The Black Prophet by William Carleton, Woodstock Books, 1996

In the following essay, Kelly investigates how the socio-political and religious atmosphere in which William Carleton was raised affected his writing.

'There never was', claims William Carleton in his uncompleted Autobiography, 'any man of letters who had an opportunity of knowing and describing the manners of the Irish people so thoroughly as I had.' This is a boast that critics have been happy to accept, with two qualifications: for 'Irish people' he should have written 'Irish peasantry', and the manners he described were those that flourished before the Great Famine of 1845-48. That famine, which was to alter forever Irish social, cultural and, eventually, political life, was already beginning when Carleton took up his pen in the spring of 1846 to write the first instalment of The Black Prophet...

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This section contains 5,012 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by John Kelly
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