Industrial Revolution | David E. E. Sloane

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of Industrial Revolution.
This section contains 3,382 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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David E. E. Sloane

SOURCE: "A Connecticut Yankee and Industrial America: Mark Twain's Lesson," in Essays in Arts and Sciences, Vol. X, No. 2, March, 1982, pp. 197-205.

In this essay, presented in 1980 as part of a series of lectures titled "Nineteenth-Century Industry and Culture in Connecticut," Sloane discusses Mark Twain's favorable impression of American industrialism as seen in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, which he calls "Twain's most ambitious attempt to make a comprehensive dramatization of the issues surrounding democracy and industrial progress."

Mark Twain, in 1871, wryly observed of a "medieval" tournament in Brooklyn, N.Y., that it was absurd to introduce the sentimentalized brag, vanity, and mock-heroics of the medieval joust into the broad-awake city of New York and the rolling mills and factories of the Northeast.2 Mark Twain was not alone among Northeastern humorists in his progressive viewpoint, for lesser writers like Max...

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This section contains 3,382 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the David E. E. Sloane
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