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Henriad | Literature Criticism The Hybrid Reformations of Shakespeare's
Second Henriad

This literature criticism consists of approximately 44 pages of analysis & critique of Henriad.
This section contains 12,912 words
(approx. 44 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Hybrid Reformations of Shakespeare's Second Henriad

Maurice Hunt, Baylor University

Granted the late-medieval, early fifteenth-century settings of Shakespeare's 1 and 2 Henry IV and Henry V, theater audiences are not surprised by the large number of references in these plays to Catholic practices and beliefs.1 What has proved problematic for commentators is the coexistence of Catholic elements with explicitly Protestant traits in Shakespeare's characterizations of Falstaff, Henry IV, and Prince Hal/Henry V. In what follows, I argue that different forms of this mixture either impede or undermine these characters' attempts during the Second Henriad to reform themselves ethically and spiritually, at least until a noteworthy blend of Catholic and Protestant traits enables King Henry V in the aftermath of Agincourt to achieve a relatively successful transformation of character. Many plays of Shakespeare are syncretic in matters of religion: Othello, for example, reflects a mixture of...

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This section contains 12,912 words
(approx. 44 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Hybrid Reformations of Shakespeare's Second Henriad
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