The House of Mirth | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of The House of Mirth.
This section contains 7,025 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Alice Meynell

SOURCE: Meynell, Alice. “The House of Mirth.Bookman 29, no. 171 (December 1905): 130-31.

In the following review, Meynell finds Wharton's moral stance lacking in The House of Mirth.

Mrs. Wharton is essentially a moralist, albeit with the whole modern resolve not to declare herself. A Gift from the Grave remains her highest, most complete, and most commanding work, because, in a memorable passage she set her sail to a natural wind. Moral passion swept through the world of that book—direct grief, emotion close to the fact of life, love, indignation, remorse, dishonour, and honour; all the storms of breasts complex, civilised, but incorrupt. In The House of Mirth we have to read of the fortunes of a woman full of desires and of self-love, but void of virtue, of passion, and of intellect; and round about her are only lovers of their own ease...

(read more)

This section contains 7,025 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Alice Meynell
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Review by Alice Meynell from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook