The Handmaid's Tale | Critical Review by Catharine R. Stimpson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of The Handmaid's Tale.
This section contains 2,130 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Catharine R. Stimpson

Critical Review by Catharine R. Stimpson

SOURCE: “Atwood Woman,” in Nation, May 31, 1986, pp. 764-7.

In the following review, Stimpson offers a positive analysis of The Handmaid's Tale.

Politics, Margaret Atwood once said, means “who is entitled to do what to whom, with impunity; who profits by it; and who therefore eats what.” The Handmaid's Tale proves that Atwood is among the most telling political writers in the West today. Simply put, The Handmaid's Tale is a feminist dystopia. Atwood transmogrifies the Cambridge, Massachusetts, of the late twentieth century into the capital of a monotheocracy, the Republic of Gilead, a nasty piece of work. Its fundamentalist founders have pulled off a bloody coup d'état. They have replaced the Constitution with the overweening patriarchal principles of Genesis. Gilead expels Jews and blacks. It compels rigid...

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This section contains 2,130 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Catharine R. Stimpson