The Handmaid's Tale | Critical Review by Paul Gray

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of The Handmaid's Tale.
This section contains 923 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Paul Gray

Critical Review by Paul Gray

SOURCE: “Repressions of a New Day,” in Time, February 10, 1986, p. 84.

In the following review, Gray offers qualified praise for The Handmaid's Tale.

Canadian Author Margaret Atwood's sixth novel will remind most readers of Nineteen Eighty-Four. That can hardly be helped. Any new fictional account of how things might go horribly wrong risks comparisons either with George Orwell's classic or with Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. To a remarkable degree, these two books have staked out the turf of contemporary antiutopias. Which punishment is it to be this time? Relentless, inescapable totalitarianism or the mindless, synthetic stupors of technology? As it turns out. Atwood's look at the future takes place under conditions that Orwell would recognize. Repression is the order of the new day in The Handmaid's Tale. But the villains in this piece are not the...

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This section contains 923 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Paul Gray