The Handmaid's Tale | Critical Essay by Dorota Filipczak

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of The Handmaid's Tale.
This section contains 6,076 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
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SOURCE: “‘Is There No Balm in Gilead?’ Biblical Intertext in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale,” in Literature and Theology at Century's End, edited by Gregory Salyer and Robert Detweiler, Scholars Press, 1995, pp. 215-33.

In the following essay, Filipczak examines the significance of the Bible as a tool of institutionalized oppression and the biblical parallels and interpretation as seen in The Handmaid's Tale.

“Tu crois que cést l'oiseau qui est libre. Tu te trompes; cést la fleur …” says Jacques Derrida in one of his essays. Freedom is asserted in the cycle of defying and accepting one's roots. The Handmaid's Tale is haunted by the echo of cultural origins, as manifest via the insidious presence of biblical images in the text. Rooted in the English language legacy of the &#x...

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This section contains 6,076 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Dorota Filipczak
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Critical Essay by Dorota Filipczak from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.