The Great Gatsby | Critical Essay by D. G. Kehl and Allene Cooper

This literature criticism consists of approximately 21 pages of analysis & critique of The Great Gatsby.
This section contains 6,162 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by D. G. Kehl and Allene Cooper

Critical Essay by D. G. Kehl and Allene Cooper

SOURCE: Kehl, D. G., and Allene Cooper. “Sangria in the Sangreal: The Great Gatsby as Grail Quest.” Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature 47, no. 4 (1993): 203-17.

In the following essay, Kehl and Cooper explore F. Scott Fitzgerald's fascination with Arthurian myths, focusing on his use of the Grail legend in The Great Gatsby in particular.

Near the end of Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise, Amory Blaine, returning to Princeton after his disillusioning sojourn in Atlantic City, concludes that he knows one thing: “If living isn't a seeking for the grail it may be a damned amusing game” (278). For Fitzgerald, by the time he wrote The Great Gatsby five years later, living had become both a quest for the grail and “a damned...

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This section contains 6,162 words
(approx. 21 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by D. G. Kehl and Allene Cooper
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