Ken Kesey | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of Ken Kesey.
This section contains 5,394 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Raymond M. Olderman

SOURCE: Olderman, Raymond M. “The Grail Knight Arrives: Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.” In A Casebook on Ken Kesey's ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest,’ edited by George J. Searles, pp. 67-79. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1992.

In the following essay, Olderman examines Ken Kesey's novel as a “brilliant version of our contemporary wasteland and a successful Grail Knight” who frees both the Fisher King and the human spirit in an act of affirmation and release.

Randle Patrick McMurphy sweeps into the asylum wasteland of Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest like April coming to T. S. Eliot's wasteland: “mixing / Memory and desire, stirring / Dull roots with spring rain.” He literally drags the unwilling asylum wastelanders out of the tranquilized fog that protects them—a fog that is forever “snowing down cold and white all over,”1 where they try to hide “in...

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This section contains 5,394 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Raymond M. Olderman
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Critical Essay by Raymond M. Olderman from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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