Federalist Papers | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Federalist Papers.
This section contains 6,724 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by George W. Carey

SOURCE: Carey, George W. Introduction to The Federalist: Design for a Constitutional Republic, pp. xi-xxiii. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989.

In the following excerpt, Carey provides an overview of The Federalist Papers, examining their inconsistencies and exploring modern critiques, interpretations, and misunderstandings of the text.

The Federalist comprises eighty-five essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay between October, 1787, and May, 1788, under the pseudonym “Publius” to help secure ratification of the proposed Constitution in New York state.1

But its status today as one of the three or four basic documents of our founding period—the others by common consent being the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights—derives from considerations that far transcend the immediate purpose of its authors.2 Indeed, some have gone so far as to rank it among the great classics of political thought because of its realistic analysis of...

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This section contains 6,724 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by George W. Carey
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Critical Essay by George W. Carey from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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