The Fall of the House of Usher | Critical Essay by Leila S. May

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of The Fall of the House of Usher.
This section contains 4,484 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Leila S. May

SOURCE: “‘Sympathies of a Scarcely Intelligible Nature,’: The Brother-Sister Bond in Poe's ‘Fall of the House of Usher,’” in Studies in Short Fiction, Vol. 30. No. 3, Summer, 1993, pp. 387-96.

In the following essay, May discusses sibling relationships in the context of nineteenth-century literature, citing “The Fall of the House of Usher” as a prophetic tale anticipating the collapse of a society that assumed the security of the family bond.

Matthew Arnold was in a distinct minority when, in 1853, he criticized the action of Sophocles's Antigone, saying that it “is no longer one in which it is possible that we should feel a deep interest.” Arnold finds that we moderns cannot use as a model “that which is narrow in the ancients...

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This section contains 4,484 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Leila S. May