Venus and Adonis (Shakespeare poem) | The Ending of Venus and Adonis

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of Venus and Adonis (Shakespeare poem).
This section contains 3,594 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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Anthony Mortimer, University of Fribourg

For much of Venus and Adonis Shakespeare seems careful to avoid direct confrontation with his source for the tale in the Metamorphoses, Book X. It is not simply that he omits all the antecedents that Ovid provides (the incestuous union of Cinyras and Myrrha, the miraculous birth of Adonis, the wounding of Venus with Cupid's arrow) and modifies the whole situation by making Adonis resist the advances of the goddess. The striking fact is that most of the frequent Ovidian echoes seem to derive from anywhere in the Metamorphoses except the passage which gave him the story in the first place. The sexually aggressive female and the reluctant youth recall Salmacis and Hermaphroditus (IV. 285-388) and, to a lesser extent, Echo and Narcissus (III. 339-510); the Lament of Venus owes little to Ovid's goddess, but a great deal to...

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This section contains 3,594 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Ending of Venus and Adonis
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