The Demon Lover | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of The Demon Lover.
This section contains 1,314 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Phyllis Lassner

"Comedies of Sex and Terror," in Elizabeth Bowen: A Study of the Short Fiction, Twayne Publishers, 1991, pp. 54-74.

In the excerpt below, Lassner examines the letter from the dead soldier in "The Demon Lover" and concludes that "the letter is a ghostly artifact, a sign that as a survivor of two wars she has internalized their terrors and guilt."

In "The Demon Lover," justifiably one of Bowen's most famous and widely anthologized stories, a soldier avenges the grim fates of war. Written during World War II, the story embeds the psychological horrors produced by a Blitzed city in a plot about "sex-antagonism," but, in a rare move for Bowen, the haunting presence is a man. The result shows how rage transcends time and space. This man cannot simply murder his lover and be done with it; he instead carries her off in a way that suggests her terror...

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This section contains 1,314 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Phyllis Lassner
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Critical Essay by Phyllis Lassner from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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