The Communist Manifesto | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 20 pages of analysis & critique of The Communist Manifesto.
This section contains 5,719 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Francis B. Randall

SOURCE: Randall, Francis B. “Introduction: Marx the Romantic.” In The Communist Manifesto, by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, translated by Samuel Moore, edited by Joseph Katz, pp. 8-41. New York: Washington Square Press, 1964.

In the following excerpt, originally written in 1963, Randall explores the Romantic influences on both Marx and The Communist Manifesto, with special focus on Marx's experience and a close reading of the first two chapters of the Manifesto.

Early in 1848 there were no communist states in the world and no revolutionary governments of any sort. There was no Communist party in our sense and no revolutionary organizations or even trade unions of any size. A few countries of northwest Europe and a few areas of the United States were industrializing rapidly, but there was no city in the world—even London—much bigger than two million people, and no state—even Great Britain—in which a...

(read more)

This section contains 5,719 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Francis B. Randall
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Francis B. Randall from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook