The Comedy of Errors | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Martine Van Elk

This literature criticism consists of approximately 34 pages of analysis & critique of The Comedy of Errors.
This section contains 10,106 words
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Critical Essay by Martine Van Elk

SOURCE: Van Elk, Martine. “Urban Misidentification in The Comedy of Errors and the Cony-Catching Pamphlets.” Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 43, no. 2 (2003): 323-46.

In the following essay, Van Elk relates instances of “misidentification” in The Comedy of Errors to the deliberate trickery represented in Elizabethan rogue literature.

In Plautus's Menaechmi, the slave Messenio cautions his master, the traveling twin who has just arrived in Epidamnus, about the dangers that lurk in the city: “among the people of Epidamnus are the most outrageous voluptuaries and drinkers; besides, very many slanderers and flatterers live there; then, the whores of no other races are said to speak with a more flattering tongue.”1 In translating the text for an early modern English audience, William Warner makes Messenio's warning more...

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This section contains 10,106 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Martine Van Elk