The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Laurel Bollinger

This literature criticism consists of approximately 32 pages of analysis & critique of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
This section contains 9,359 words
(approx. 32 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Laurel Bollinger

Critical Essay by Laurel Bollinger

SOURCE: Bollinger, Laurel. “Say It, Jim: The Morality of Connection in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.College Literature 29, no. 1 (winter 2002): 32-52.

In the following essay, Bollinger focuses on the theme of connectivity in the The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

The American literary tradition has often been defined by its moments of radical autonomy—Thoreau at his pond, Ishmael offering his apostrophe to “landlessness,” Huck “light[ing] out for the Territory ahead of the rest” (Twain 1995, 265). In fact, Twain's novel is often taught as the text that epitomizes this tradition, with Huck held up as its exemplar: a boy courageous enough to stand against the moral conventions of his society, to risk Hell itself rather than conform to the “sivilizing” process of communities...

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This section contains 9,359 words
(approx. 32 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Laurel Bollinger