Tennessee Williams | Critical Essay by Michael R. Schiavi

This literature criticism consists of approximately 24 pages of analysis & critique of Tennessee Williams.
This section contains 7,126 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael R. Schiavi

Critical Essay by Michael R. Schiavi

SOURCE: Schiavi, Michael R. “The Hungry Women of Tennessee Williams's Fiction.” In Tennessee Williams: A Casebook, edited by Robert F. Gross, pp. 107-20. New York: Routledge, 2002.

In the following essay, Schiavi elucidates the role of feminine hunger in Williams's short fiction.

Throughout his “secondary” career as a fiction writer, Tennessee Williams repeatedly staged dramas of female appetite. This theme also anchors some of his seminal stagework: A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), Summer and Smoke (1948), The Rose Tattoo (1951), and Kingdom of Earth (1968) all pivot upon women's sexual needs and satisfactions. In short stories, however, Williams proved far more adept at tracing multiple female desires as they transfix and baffle observation. Free from Broadway's narrow conception of stageworthy bodies, Williams the storywriter spent nearly fifty years displaying women in open gratification of various...

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This section contains 7,126 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Michael R. Schiavi
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