Annals (Tacitus) | Critical Essay by Ellen O'Gorman

This literature criticism consists of approximately 30 pages of analysis & critique of Annals (Tacitus).
This section contains 8,796 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ellen O'Gorman

Critical Essay by Ellen O'Gorman

SOURCE: O'Gorman, Ellen. “Introduction: Irony, History, Reading.” In Irony and Misreading in the “Annals” of Tacitus, pp. 1-22. Cambridge, U. K: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

In the following essay, O'Gorman contends that the very structure of Tacitus's sentences in the Annals conveys meaning and that he deliberately uses complex and ironic passages to force readers to engage in reflection.

The ironist aspires to be somebody who gets in on some redescription, who manages to change some parts of the vocabularies being used. The ironist wants to be a strong poet.

Michael Roth, The Ironist's Cage

Sentence Structure and Historical Interpretation

Tacitus is a notoriously difficult writer; the central theme of this study is what the difficulty of Tacitus means and what are the possible ways a reader can respond to this...

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This section contains 8,796 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Ellen O'Gorman
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