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Critical Essay | Critical Review by Stephen Wall

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of Critical Review by Stephen Wall.
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Critical Review by Stephen Wall

SOURCE: "Self-Slaughters," in London Review of Books, Vol. 14, No. 5, March 12, 1992, p. 26.

In the following review, Wall considers the plot and themes in Ever After.

Graham Swift's new novel [Ever After], like its two predecessors, is about a man who wants to reconstruct the past. In Waterland (1983) this enterprise was conducted—plausibly enough if rather insistently—by a history teacher who saw in his imminent redundancy more than the demotion of his subject. Cutting back on history meant cutting off adults as well as children from the stories about the world that are among their deepest needs. History lies about us in our infancy, and in his case the Fenland child was the father of the pedagogic man. The hero of Out of this World (1988) was a famous photographer of wars and their aftermaths as well as the...

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This section contains 1,648 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Critical Review by Stephen Wall - Critical Review by Stephen Wall
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