May Swenson | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 13 pages of analysis & critique of May Swenson.
This section contains 3,609 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Howard

SOURCE: "May Swenson," in Tri-Quarterly, No. 7, Fall, 1966, pp. 119-31.

Howard is an American poet, critic, and translator who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1970 for his poetry collection Untitled Subjects (1969). In the following essay, he traces the poetic style evinced in Swenson's verse, finding it magical and incantatory.

A harsh assessment of Swenson:

May Swenson begins and ends in mannerism. She is forever tinkering, taking apart a cat, a watch, a poem. Without evident embarrassment she can tell us (in "The Watch") that the watchmaker "… leaned like an ogre over my / naked watch. With critical pincers he / poked and stirred. He / lifted out little private things with a magnet too tiny for me / to watch almost. 'Watch out!' I / almost said …" I'm not just sure what kind of good fun this is. She is endlessly feeling things and relentlessly fashionable about what there is to grab….

For May...

(read more)

This section contains 3,609 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Howard
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Essay by Richard Howard from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook