William Shakespeare | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 34 pages of analysis & critique of William Shakespeare.
This section contains 9,112 words
(approx. 31 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stuart M. Kurland

SOURCE: “Hamlet and the Scottish Succession,” in Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, Vol. 34, No. 2, Spring, 1994, pp. 279-300.

In the essay below, Kurland argues that Hamlet portrays the controversy surrounding James's succession to Queen Elizabeth's throne. The political world of Hamlet, explains Kurland, is informed by England's uncertainty generated by James's threats to secure the English throne through military action.

Surveying earlier topical interpretations of Tudor drama, David Bevington observed in 1968 that “Hamlet offers a rich field for topicality … and reveals perhaps most clearly the basic error of the lockpicking sleuth.” Among the theories that were no longer “given serious attention” was Lilian Winstanley's, in “Hamlet” and the Scottish Succession, published in 1921. Winstanley maintained that Hamlet employed “historical analogues” that were “important, numerous, detailed and undeniable” in an effort “to excite as much sympathy as possible for the Essex conspirators, and for the Scottish succession.” Indeed, Winstanley explicitly identified...

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This section contains 9,112 words
(approx. 31 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stuart M. Kurland
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Critical Essay by Stuart M. Kurland from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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