Macbeth | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Sarah Wintle and René Weis

This literature criticism consists of approximately 19 pages of analysis & critique of Macbeth.
This section contains 5,454 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sarah Wintle and René Weis

Critical Essay by Sarah Wintle and René Weis

SOURCE: “Macbeth and the Barren Sceptre,” in Essays in Criticism, Vol. 41, No. 2, April, 1991, pp. 128-46.

In the following essay, Wintle and Weis examine the relationship between James I's legitimacy issues and Macbeth's concern with succession and legitimacy as revealed through the play's emphasis on children and babies.

Tragedy often begins with trouble from the children. Among Shakespeare's tragedies King Lear is the most obvious example, although Hamlet runs it a close second. Even Desdemona, as Rymer observed, would not have died if she had obeyed her father1. At the end of most Shakespearean comedy and romance a new generation of family stands ready to take over; in the tragedies on the other hand power passes to a representative of another family altogether, to Fortinbras, Edgar or Albany...

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This section contains 5,454 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Sarah Wintle and René Weis