Lie Down in Darkness | Critical Essay by Richard Pearce

This literature criticism consists of approximately 12 pages of analysis & critique of Lie Down in Darkness.
This section contains 3,466 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Pearce

Critical Essay by Richard Pearce

[The] feeling of war as the condition of life pervades all of Styron's works: in Lie Down in Darkness, Peyton Loftis commits suicide on the day the bomb is dropped on Nagasaki; in Set This House on Fire Cass Kinsolving traces the beginning of his self-destructive striving to his experiences in World War II, which drove him to the psychiatric ward. And even The Confessions of Nat Turner, although set a full century earlier, is informed by the spirit of the battlefield.

Besides being inescapable, war is outrageously unreasonable. The enemy is undefined; heroic action becomes clownish and self-destructive…. What Styron shows in his most convincing fiction is, first, that beneath the calm and affluent exterior of modern life lies a violent potential, and, second, that this violence has a capricious life of its own and erupts as a...

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This section contains 3,466 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard Pearce