Uncle Tom's Cabin | Critical Essay by Stephen J. DeCanio

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of Uncle Tom's Cabin.
This section contains 2,007 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Stephen J. DeCanio

SOURCE: "Uncle Tom's Cabin: A Reappraisal," in The Centennial Review, Vol. XXXIV, No. 4, Fall, 1990, pp. 587-93.

In the following excerpt, DeCanio examines the philosophical questions underlying Uncle Tom's Cabin, suggesting that Stowe's treatment of religion and faith has as much relevance for a modern audience as her commentary on gender and ethnicity..

Uncle Tom's Cabin, the main work for which Harriet Beecher Stowe is now remembered, is enjoying a rebirth. With the received "canon" of American literature under attack as elitist, racist, and sexist, it is not surprising that an authentic anti-slavery novel, written by a nineteenth-century radical abolitionist woman, should be viewed with new favor. In truth, Uncle Tom's Cabin has been a neglected classic. What is ironic, however, is that the book is intriguing not primarily because of the gender of its author or the ethnicity...

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This section contains 2,007 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Stephen J. DeCanio