Empire of the Sun | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Empire of the Sun.
This section contains 1,034 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Tom O'Brien

SOURCE: O'Brien, Tom. “Go East, Young Man.” Commonweal 115, no. 1 (15 January 1988): 20-1.

In the following review, O'Brien notes Spielberg's tendency toward childishness and sentimentality in Empire of the Sun.

Steven Spielberg, who directed and co-produced Empire of the Sun, doesn't want to grow up. In some artists, this refusal can be a fruitful source of protest against time, or, if handled ironically, bittersweet humor. Any obsession can be fruitful; look how wittily Hitchcock handled his with blondes. A director can return to the same theme, or change subjects and deal with a similar theme (as Spielberg has done here with growing up), and still mature artistically. Tone is all.

Empire feels like two films: a stirring, even scary epic spliced with a stagy, unconscious self-glorification. English child actor Christian Bale, as the son of a British diplomat in Shanghai, almost saves the movie with his portrayal of grace and...

(read more)

This section contains 1,034 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Tom O'Brien
Copyrights
Gale
Critical Review by Tom O'Brien from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook