The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy | Critical Essay by Richard A. Lanham

This literature criticism consists of approximately 43 pages of analysis & critique of The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy.
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Critical Essay by Richard A. Lanham

SOURCE: "The Self-Serving Narrator," in his Tristram Shandy: The Games of Pleasure, University of California Press, 1973, pp. 93-130.

In the following essay, Lanham contends that seemingly random interruptions of the main narrative by the protagonist/narrator of Tristram Shandy derive from classical examples of digression.

I

Tristram's fondness for philosophically justified digression has bemused his admirers into overlooking the older narrative pattern from which the digressions depart. For all his joking about Locke's history-book, Tristram was writing one himself, an intellectual autobiography. His proceedings will be those of a classic chronicler, he declares early in Book I:

He will have views and prospects to himself perpetually solliciting his eye, which he can no more help standing still to look at than he cari fly; he will moreover have various

Accounts to reconcile:
Anecdotes to pick up:
Inscriptions to...

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This section contains 12,874 words
(approx. 43 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Richard A. Lanham