The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy | Critical Essay by Howard Anderson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 30 pages of analysis & critique of The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy.
This section contains 16,363 words
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Critical Essay by Howard Anderson

SOURCE: "Structure, Language, Experience in the Novels of Laurence Sterne," in The First English Novelists: Essays in Understanding, Tennessee Studies in Literature Vol. 29, edited by J. M. Armistead, The University of Tennessee Press, 1985, pp. 185-223.

In the following essay, Anderson describes Sterne's novels as full of "surprises" and tries to show how a patient reader learns both to expect and be enlightened by these surprises (or unconventional narrative techniques) so that, ultimately, Sterne's novels "come to matter.…

Tristram Shandy and A Sentimental Journey1 are surprises waiting for readers. "I wish either my father or my mother, or indeed both of them, as they were in duty both equally bound to it, had minded what they were about when they begot me.…" Tristram's first words to us are urgent, without context, unintroduced. Here is Yorick: "They order, said I...

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This section contains 16,363 words
(approx. 55 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Melvyn New