The Mismeasure of Man | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 16 pages of analysis & critique of The Mismeasure of Man.
This section contains 4,303 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by R. C. Lewontin

SOURCE: Lewontin, R. C. “The Inferiority Complex.” New York Review of Books 28, no. 6 (22 October 1981): 12-16.

In the following review of The Mismeasure of Man, Lewontin contextualizes Gould's arguments about faulty data collection, IQ testing, and the flawed thinking behind biological determinism.

The first meeting of Oliver Twist and young Jack Dawkins, the Artful Dodger, on the road to London was a confrontation between two stereotypes of nineteenth-century literature. The Dodger was a “snub-nosed, flat-browed, common-faced boy … with rather bow legs and little sharp ugly eyes.” Nor was he much on English grammar and pronunciation. “I've got to be in London tonight,” he tells Oliver, “and I know a 'spectable old genelman lives there, wot'll give you lodgings for nothink. …” He was just what we might have expected of a ten-year-old street-wise orphan with no education and no loving family, brought up among the dregs of the Victorian Lumpenproletariat...

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This section contains 4,303 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by R. C. Lewontin
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Critical Review by R. C. Lewontin from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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