Sonnet 29 | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by George T. Wright

This literature criticism consists of approximately 32 pages of analysis & critique of Sonnet 29.
This section contains 9,462 words
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Critical Essay by George T. Wright

SOURCE: “The Silent Speech of Shakespeare's Sonnets,” in Shakespeare and the Twentieth Century: The Selected Proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Los Angeles, 1996, edited by Jonathan Bate, Jill L. Levenson, and Dieter Mehl, University of Delaware Press, 1998, pp. 314-35.

In the following essay, originally presented in 1996, Wright maintains that Shakespeare’s sonnets to the young main introduced a new mode of poetic discourse.

Then others for the breath of words respect, Me for my dumb thoughts, speaking in effect. 

—Shakespeare, Sonnet 85

O learn to read what silent love hath writ. 

—Shakespeare, Sonnet 23

Absence, Silence

O absent presence Stella is not here. 

—Sidney, Astrophel and Stella

He is not here. 

—Tennyson, In Memoriam

Non c'é. 

Madama Butterfly

In his rich study of The Portrait in the Renaissance...

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This section contains 9,462 words
(approx. 32 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by George T. Wright