William Shakespeare | Critical Essay by Gerald Hammond

This literature criticism consists of approximately 11 pages of analysis & critique of William Shakespeare.
This section contains 8,631 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Bruce R. Smith

Critical Essay by Gerald Hammond

SOURCE: "'This Poet Lies': Text and Subtext," in The Reader and Shakespeare 's Young Man Sonnets, Barnes & Noble Books, 1981, pp. 11-29.

In this essay, Hammond explores the sources of readers ' uncertainties about the predominant tone of the sequence and the mood of individual sonnets. Focusing on Sonnets 1-19, he illustrates the discrepancies between text and subtext, the sometimes bewildering array of possible meanings in a single line or quatrain, and the sonnets' immunity to comprehensive generalizations.

I begin by wondering why Shakespeare's sonnets should be so unpopular. Despite their being the only collection of poems by our greatest poet, as a sequence they remain almost as unconsidered and unread as they were in his lifetime.1 Individual sonnets are known and loved, but as exceptions to the general run of a collection of lifeless poems. Even literary critics have...

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This section contains 8,631 words
(approx. 29 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Bruce R. Smith