Hamlet | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Linwood E. Orange

This literature criticism consists of approximately 15 pages of analysis & critique of Hamlet.
This section contains 4,406 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Linwood E. Orange

Critical Essay by Linwood E. Orange

SOURCE: Orange, Linwood E. “Hamlet's Mad Soliloquy.” South Atlantic Quarterly 64, no. 1 (winter 1965): 60-71.

In the following essay, Orange asserts that as Hamlet is delivering his “To be, or not to be” soliloquy (III.i) he is fully aware of Ophelia's presence and suspects that Claudius and Polonius, though not visible onstage, can hear his words. Thus the speech is not an introspective reflection, the critic argues, but a calculated strategy to deceive his enemies into believing that he is so mentally distracted that he is considering killing himself.

To the two major groups into which nearly all Hamlet critics inevitably fall, the “to be” soliloquy is of crucial importance.1 The Romantic critics and the enormous number of late nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers who hold that Hamlet&#x...

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This section contains 4,406 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Linwood E. Orange