William Morris | Critical Essay by Florence S. Boos

This literature criticism consists of approximately 34 pages of analysis & critique of William Morris.
This section contains 10,040 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Florence S. Boos

Critical Essay by Florence S. Boos

SOURCE: “An (Almost) Egalitarian Sage: William Morris and Nineteenth-Century Socialist-Feminism,” in Victorian Sages and Cultural Discourse: Renegotiating Gender and Power, edited by Thaïs E. Morgan, Rutgers University Press, 1990, pp. 187-206.

In the following essay, Boos investigates the socialist-feminist element in William Morris's writing.

In the last decade of his life, William Morris developed a sage voice of “fellowship” in works whose most memorable protagonists are outsiders: a working-class revolutionary; a soon-to-be-martyred visionary priest; two “guests” who are displaced from their physical and temporal origins; and two young women who seek to realize new forms of wisdom, independence, and social justice. Throughout his life, Morris had included in his works striking portrayals of women, and a high valuation of characteristics he considered “...

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This section contains 10,040 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Florence S. Boos
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