Rebecca (film) | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol

This literature criticism consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis & critique of Rebecca (film).
This section contains 2,222 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol

Critical Essay by Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol

With Rebecca, the "Hitchcock touch," which has previously been merely a distinguishing feature, becomes a vision of the world. Spontaneity submits to a system. This is a critical moment for an artist, for he must not develop tics, a pedagogical fury. Hitchcock was to avoid these traps. From now on, the two poles of his future work—because we can now talk of a body of work—are clear. One is fascination, moral captation—in other words, depersonalization, schism: in psychoanalytic terms, schizophrenia; in philosophic terms, amoralism; in Baudelairean terms, the assumption of evil, damnation. The other pole is its opposite: knowledge—or, more exactly, reknowledge—of self, unity of being, acceptance, confession, absolute communion. (p. 58)

Alfred Hitchcock's stories come from a great variety of sources, but very early...

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This section contains 2,222 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol
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