Isaac Bashevis Singer | Critical Essay by The New Yorker

This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of Isaac Bashevis Singer.
This section contains 234 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by The New Yorker

Critical Essay by The New Yorker

"At the onset of the nineteen-thirties, my disillusionment with myself reached a stage in which I had lost all hope." With these wryly self-mocking words Mr. Singer begins his third volume of memoirs [Lost in America] which takes him from Warsaw to New York by way of Paris, and then on a harrowing (illegal) train trip to Toronto to gain the permanent visa that will prevent his deportation to Nazi-occupied Poland. Many of the features of Mr. Singer's adventures as an up-and-coming writer will be familiar to readers of his novels and short stories: he shares lodgings with ghosts and dybbuks (and blames them for his chronic writer's block); girlfriends materialize wherever he alights; and old acquaintances bring him up to date on their marital troubles over coffee and rice pudding in kosher cafeterias. The author survives one...

(read more)

This section contains 234 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by The New Yorker
Follow Us on Facebook