Shirley Ann Grau | Critical Review by L. Elizabeth Bryant

This literature criticism consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis & critique of Shirley Ann Grau.
This section contains 333 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mary Rohrberger

Critical Review by L. Elizabeth Bryant

SOURCE: A review of Roadwalkers, in Belles Lettres, Vol. 10, No. 2, Spring, 1995, p. 86.

In the following review of Roadwalkers, Bryant describes Grau's skill in evoking the narrator's viewpoint.

Time is an indeterminate factor in this new novel by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Shirley Ann Grau. Roadwalkers begins with the story of Baby, a homeless and abandoned black girl whose early nomadic life struggle leaves her with a wispy memory, and forces her to approach life with stunning inventiveness. This first section of the book is appropriately and beautifully ethereal: events recalled in the language of a child who has never known a definitive context, and so creates her own. This device which initially underscores the plot becomes occasionally murky and not quite believable, however, as the novel is laid out in fits and starts. Soon after we learn about and...

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This section contains 333 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Mary Rohrberger
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