Sharon Pollock | Critical Essay by Robert C. Nunn

This literature criticism consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis & critique of Sharon Pollock.
This section contains 1,823 words
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SOURCE: Nunn, Robert C. “Performing Fact: Canadian Documentary Theatre.” Canadian Literature, no. 103 (winter 1984): 51-62.

In the following excerpt, Nunn examines the documentary genre in Canadian theater and illustrates the importance of audience inclusion in Pollock's The Komagata Maru Incident.

Documentary theatre is a creation of our century: its history begins with Erwin Piscator's production of In Spite of Everything in 1925.1 Many reasons have been advanced for its development: it is a response to a deeply-felt need to penetrate to the truth hidden in the massive accumulation of facts;2 it is an adaptation of the rhythm and tempo of theatre to a sensibility created by the mass media, especially film;3 it is designed to dispel “the artificial fog behind which the world's rulers hide their manipulations.”4 It is indeed, like its close cousin, epic theatre, theatre for...

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This section contains 1,823 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Robert C. Nunn
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Robert C. Nunn from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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