Virginia Woolf | Literature Criticism Harold Fromm

This literature criticism consists of approximately 22 pages of analysis & critique of Virginia Woolf.
This section contains 6,572 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
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Harold Fromm

SOURCE: "Virginia Woolf: Art and Sexuality," in The Virginia Quarterly Review, Vol. 55, No. 3, Summer, 1979, pp. 441-59.

In the following essay, Fromm responds to critics who see Virginia Woolf's writing as characteristically "sexless. "

Since the publication in 1941 of her last novel, Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf's reputation has undergone radical transformation. At first characterized as "experimental" and treated from an esthetic vantage point, her novels received serious, if somewhat limited, examinations as literary productions, while a view prevailed of her as a rather precious Bohemian associated with slightly disreputable characters from Bloomsbury. But even as late as the sixties, when Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse—and by some, The Waves—were considered major works, she herself was not regarded as one of the major figures of 20th-century literature, and as recently as 1975 the...

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This section contains 6,572 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Harold Fromm