Sense and Sensibility | Critical Essay by Moreland Perkins

This literature criticism consists of approximately 30 pages of analysis & critique of Sense and Sensibility.
This section contains 8,817 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Moreland Perkins

SOURCE: "Elinor Dashwood: The Heroine as Intellectual," in Reshaping the Sexes in Sense and Sensibility, University Press of Virginia, 1998, pp. 11–36.

In the following essay, Perkins advances the theory that Sense and Sensibility is Elinor Dashwood's story, not Marianne's, and argues that her special interest lies in her position as a female intellectual.

Because many first-time readers of Sense and Sensibility find Marianne the more appealing of the two elder Dashwood sisters, they may think of her as the primary heroine. For those readers, Marianne's early disappointment, long suffering, and ultimate fade-out can figure as a major disincentive for rereading the novel. However, once we start to understand how much there is in Austin's rendering of Elinor Dashwood that is not only appealing but politically significant, the realization that the novel is written as her story may awaken in us...

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This section contains 8,817 words
(approx. 30 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Moreland Perkins