Sense and Sensibility | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Alastair Duckworth

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Sense and Sensibility.
This section contains 4,910 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alastair Duckworth

Critical Essay by Alastair Duckworth

SOURCE: "Improving on Sensibility," in New Casebooks: Sense and Sensibility and Pride Prejudice, edited by Robert Clark, St. Martin's Press, 1994, pp. 26–37.

In the following essay, Duckworth examines Sense and Sensibility's two heroines and argues that Austen did not intend for the novel's conclusion to be merely a "happy ending, " but one in which the marriages are grounded in a moral society.

As many scholars have shown, Jane Austen works within inherited terms of aesthetic and ethical debate. Mrs Inchbald's Art and Nature (1796) and Maria Edgeworth's Letters of Julia and Caroline (1795) are only two of many novels, in the decade in which Sense and Sensibility had its genesis as Elinor and Marianne, to anticipate Jane Austen's treatment of familiar dualities of prudence and benevolence, reason and...

(read more)

This section contains 4,910 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Alastair Duckworth