Jean-Paul Sartre | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of Jean-Paul Sartre.
This section contains 801 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Hugh J. Silverman

Jean-Paul Sartre continues to add to the file which he opened with the 1964 publication of his autobiography, The Words. At the time, those who expected that the philosopher-writer would reveal secrets of his adult life were doubtless disappointed by the self-portrait of his childhood. For the philosopher whose task is to "situate" the individual, The Words could at most be the first gesture. Yet in this account of the early years, much of his mature thought is presemt—albeit in an oblique and barely explicit form. By 1964, Sartre's thought had already undergone a significant revision from his early theory of consciousness. The young boy's "fundamental project" of becoming a writer is revealed in The Words as an autobiographizing which incorporates a theory of individual action as conditioned by, but attempting to overcome, social institutions and social class. (p. 142)

Life/Situations—will do more for those seeking to follow...

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This section contains 801 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Hugh J. Silverman
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Critical Essay by Hugh J. Silverman from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.