The Catcher in the Rye | Critical Essay by Granville Hicks

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of The Catcher in the Rye.
This section contains 974 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Granville Hicks

Last spring I taught a course in contemporary fiction at New York University. When I was drawing up the reading list, a veteran teacher whom I consulted mildly questioned the inclusion of J. D. Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye." "It's the one book," he said "that every undergraduate in America has read." I think he was pretty nearly right about that, but, for my own sake, I'm glad I decided to teach the book. To most of my students, I discovered, Holden Caulfield meant more than Jake Barnes or Jay Gatsby or Augie March or any other character we encountered in the course, and in the discussion of the novel there was a sense of direct involvement such as I felt on no other occasion.

For the college generations of the Fifties, Salinger has the kind of importance that Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway...

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This section contains 974 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Granville Hicks
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Granville Hicks from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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