John Ruskin | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by David C. Hanson

This literature criticism consists of approximately 23 pages of analysis & critique of John Ruskin.
This section contains 6,893 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by David C. Hanson

SOURCE: " 'Out of the Same Mouth Proceedeth Blessing and Cursing': Ruskin as the 'Strange Disciple'," in Modern Philology, Vol. 90, No. 3, February, 1993, pp. 360-380.

In the following excerpt, Hanson examines Ruskin's idealized version of his own childhood from the perspective of a God who is capable of condemning as well as blessing.

I

In his childhood conception of a sacred covenant, John Ruskin exulted in the exchange of a child's obedience for the Father's blessing. He was reluctant, however, to confront the Lord's cursing, which, inescapable in Scripture, left him silent and incapacitated. He abruptly ended his childhood sermons, the Sermons on the Pentateuch, with an unfinished account of the cursing in Deuteronomy. Thirty years later, on the verge of a religious crisis, he cut short his epistolary sermons...

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This section contains 6,893 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by David C. Hanson