The God of Small Things | Criticism

Arundhati Roy
This literature criticism consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis & critique of The God of Small Things.
This section contains 815 words
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SOURCE: "Melodrama as Structure for Subtlety," in The New York Times, June 3, 1997, p. C15.

[In the following review, Kakutani praises Roy's keen observation of human nature.]

The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy's dazzling first novel, begins as a sort of mystery story. What caused the boy named Estha to stop talking? What sent his twin sister, Rahel, into exile in the United States? Why did their beautiful mother, Ammu, end up dying alone in a grimy hotel room? What killed their English cousin, Sophie Mol? And why has a "whiff of scandal" involving sex and death come to surround their bourgeois family?

While such questions may sound crudely melodramatic, they provide the narrative architecture of a novel that turns out to be as subtle as it is powerful, a novel that is Faulknerian in its ambitious tackling of family and race and class, Dickensian in its sharp-eyed...

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This section contains 815 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The God of Small Things
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The God of Small Things from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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