The God of Small Things | Criticism

Arundhati Roy
This literature criticism consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis & critique of The God of Small Things.
This section contains 341 words
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SOURCE: Review of The God of Small Things, in Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 1997, p. 412.

[In the following review, the critic commends Roy's "spectacular" first novel.]

A brilliantly constructed first novel that untangles an intricate web of sexual and caste conflict in a vivid style reminiscent of Salman Rushdie's early work.

The major characters are Estha and Rahel, the fraternal twin son and daughter of a wealthy family living in the province of Kerala. The family's prosperity is derived from a pickle factory and rubber estate, and their prideful Anglophilia essentially estranges them from their country's drift toward Communism and their "inferiors'" hunger for independence and equality. The events of a crucial December day in 1969—including an accidental death that may have been no accident and the violent consequences that afflict an illicit couple who have broken "the Love Law"—are the moral and narrative center around which the episodes...

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This section contains 341 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The God of Small Things
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Gale
The God of Small Things from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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