The God of Small Things | Criticism

Arundhati Roy
This literature criticism consists of approximately 1 page of analysis & critique of The God of Small Things.
This section contains 289 words
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SOURCE: Review of The God of Small Things, in Publishers Weekly, March 3, 1997, p. 62.

[In the following review, the critic praises Roy's subtle handling of complex issues and her masterful storytelling.]

With sensuous prose, a dreamlike style infused with breath-takingly beautiful images and keen insight into human nature, Roy's debut novel [The God of Small Things] charts fresh territory in the genre of magical, prismatic literature. Set in Kerala, India, during the late 1960s when Communism rattled the age-old caste system, the story begins with the funeral of young Sophie Mol, the cousin of the novel's protagonists, Rahel and her fraternal twin brother, Estha. In a circuitous and suspenseful narrative, Roy reveals the family tensions that led to the twins' behavior on the fateful night that Sophie drowned. Beneath the drama of a family tragedy lies a background of local politics, social taboos and the tide of history—all...

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This section contains 289 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy The God of Small Things
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The God of Small Things from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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