Robert Stone | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis & critique of Robert Stone.
This section contains 1,208 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by John Garvey

SOURCE: Garvey, John. “Bleak, Thrilling, and Funny.” Commonweal 125, no. 11 (5 June 1998): 24-5.

In the following review, Garvey argues that Damascus Gate succeeds both as a thriller and as an examination of spirituality, extolling its use of such elements as dark humor, adventure, and the quest for truth.

Damascus Gate has a number of elements which will be familiar to Robert Stone's readers: drugs, alcohol, the threat of violence, death, and characters searching desperately for a meaning that eludes them. But this novel is unique in the way that it approaches, head-on, the theme that moves in the background of other Stone novels: a God who has withdrawn from the universe. In much of Stone's work there is a sense either that there is no God, and we need him, or there is a God, and he is guilty of having abandoned us. This is a kind of visceral, felt...

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This section contains 1,208 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by John Garvey
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Critical Review by John Garvey from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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