Robert Stone | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Robert Stone.
This section contains 897 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by James Hynes

SOURCE: Hynes, James. “A Lost Soul in Israel.” Washington Post Book World (3 May 1998): 1, 10.

In the following review, Hynes contends that Damascus Gate is ambitious, powerful, and “Dickensian” in its scope.

Robert Stone's reputation as a political novelist is something of an oversimplification. The practice of politics in his novels is almost always desperate, bloody and futile. And there has been a strong spiritual undercurrent to Stone's work; his first three novels each open with a scene between a lost soul of one sort or another and a Christian missionary. Almost all of his books conclude with a major character in a desolate place, stripped of all illusions under a merciless sky—the Nietzschean mercenary Hicks in Dog Soldiers, the morally compromised anthropologist Holliwell in A Flag for Sunrise, the crazed sailor Browne in Outerbridge Reach. Much of the action in his work might be described as characters searching...

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This section contains 897 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by James Hynes
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Critical Review by James Hynes from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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