Robert Stone | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis & critique of Robert Stone.
This section contains 916 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Keith Miller

SOURCE: Miller, Keith. “Messed-Up but Macho.” Times Literary Supplement, no. 4947 (23 January 1998): 21.

In the following review, Miller praises Bear and His Daughter, asserting that Stone is a careful, polished writer who deserves to be read.

Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you. The insight would come as no surprise to the characters in Bear and His Daughter. Their mistrust and hostility towards life is deep-rooted and pathological, but almost invariably justified by events. The seven laconic tales of betrayal, psychosis and loss collected here evoke a chilly, fragmented, unhopeful culture on the brink of collapse. Fortunately for us, they are also witty, compassionate, impeccably constructed and, for the most part, an astringent pleasure to read.

Robert Stone began writing in the late 1960s, and many of his characters are manifestly casualties of that period. Their problems are those of middle age—failure of purpose...

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This section contains 916 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Review by Keith Miller
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Critical Review by Keith Miller from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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